Tag Archives: history

E.S. Curtis (part 2)

As promised, from the national archive. Many in the archive are in .tif format and required some work. There are literally thousands in the archive. Just a few more here. Oh, yeah, and don’t forget that mostly these are high resolution, click ’em for full size.

Telling stories

Telling stories

Apache Chief: Ndee-Chang--O-Conch

Apache Chief: Ndee-Chang--O-Conch

In a Piegan Lodge

In a Piegan Lodge

Apache: De-Ga-ZZa

Apache: De-Ga-ZZa

Washoe woman

Washoe woman

Spokane man

Spokane man

Crow warrior

Crow warrior

custerscouts

Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce

Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce

I Will Fight No More Forever

Surrender Speech by Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce

I am tired of fighting.  Our chiefs are killed.  Looking Glass is dead.  Toohulhulsote is dead.  The old men are all dead.  It is the young men who say yes or no. He who led the young men is dead.
It is cold and we have no blankets.  The little children are freezing to death.  My people, some of them, have run away to the hills and have no blankets, no food.  No one knows where they are–perhaps freezing to death.  I want to have time to look for my children and see how many I can find.  Maybe I shall find them among the dead.
Hear me, my chiefs.  I am tired.  My heart is sick and sad.  From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever.

Arikara medecine fraternity

Arikara medecine fraternity

Two Strike

Two Strike

Hopi

Hopi

Chief Seattle

Chief Seattle

“CHIEF SEATTLE’S 1854 ORATION” – ver . 1

AUTHENTIC TEXT OF CHIEF SEATTLE’S TREATY ORATION 1854

Yonder sky that has wept tears of compassion upon my people for centuries untold, and which to us appears changeless and eternal, may change. Today is fair. Tomorrow it may be overcast with clouds. My words are like the stars that never change. Whatever Seattle says, the great chief at Washington can rely upon with as much certainty as he can upon the return of the sun or the seasons. The white chief says that Big Chief at Washington sends us greetings of friendship and goodwill. This is kind of him for we know he has little need of our friendship in return. His people are many. They are like the grass that covers vast prairies. My people are few. They resemble the scattering trees of a storm-swept plain. The great, and I presume — good, White Chief sends us word that he wishes to buy our land but is willing to allow us enough to live comfortably. This indeed appears just, even generous, for the Red Man no longer has rights that he need respect, and the offer may be wise, also, as we are no longer in need of an extensive country.

There was a time when our people covered the land as the waves of a wind-ruffled sea cover its shell-paved floor, but that time long since passed away with the greatness of tribes that are now but a mournful memory. I will not dwell on, nor mourn over, our untimely decay, nor reproach my paleface brothers with hastening it, as we too may have been somewhat to blame.

Youth is impulsive. When our young men grow angry at some real or imaginary wrong, and disfigure their faces with black paint, it denotes that their hearts are black, and that they are often cruel and relentless, and our old men and old women are unable to restrain them. Thus it has ever been. Thus it was when the white man began to push our forefathers ever westward. But let us hope that the hostilities between us may never return. We would have everything to lose and nothing to gain. Revenge by young men is considered gain, even at the cost of their own lives, but old men who stay at home in times of war, and mothers who have sons to lose, know better.

Our good father in Washington–for I presume he is now our father as well as yours, since King George has moved his boundaries further north–our great and good father, I say, sends us word that if we do as he desires he will protect us. His brave warriors will be to us a bristling wall of strength, and his wonderful ships of war will fill our harbors, so that our ancient enemies far to the northward — the Haidas and Tsimshians — will cease to frighten our women, children, and old men. Then in reality he will be our father and we his children. But can that ever be? Your God is not our God! Your God loves your people and hates mine! He folds his strong protecting arms lovingly about the paleface and leads him by the hand as a father leads an infant son. But, He has forsaken His Red children, if they really are His. Our God, the Great Spirit, seems also to have forsaken us. Your God makes your people wax stronger every day. Soon they will fill all the land. Our people are ebbing away like a rapidly receding tide that will never return. The white man’s God cannot love our people or He would protect them. They seem to be orphans who can look nowhere for help. How then can we be brothers? How can your God become our God and renew our prosperity and awaken in us dreams of returning greatness? If we have a common Heavenly Father He must be partial, for He came to His paleface children. We never saw Him. He gave you laws but had no word for His red children whose teeming multitudes once filled this vast continent as stars fill the firmament. No; we are two distinct races with separate origins and separate destinies. There is little in common between us.

To us the ashes of our ancestors are sacred and their resting place is hallowed ground. You wander far from the graves of your ancestors and seemingly without regret. Your religion was written upon tablets of stone by the iron finger of your God so that you could not forget. The Red Man could never comprehend or remember it. Our religion is the traditions of our ancestors — the dreams of our old men, given them in solemn hours of the night by the Great Spirit; and the visions of our sachems, and is written in the hearts of our people.

Your dead cease to love you and the land of their nativity as soon as they pass the portals of the tomb and wander away beyond the stars. They are soon forgotten and never return. Our dead never forget this beautiful world that gave them being. They still love its verdant valleys, its murmuring rivers, its magnificent mountains, sequestered vales and verdant lined lakes and bays, and ever yearn in tender fond affection over the lonely hearted living, and often return from the happy hunting ground to visit, guide, console, and comfort them.

Day and night cannot dwell together. The Red Man has ever fled the approach of the White Man, as the morning mist flees before the morning sun. However, your proposition seems fair and I think that my people will accept it and will retire to the reservation you offer them. Then we will dwell apart in peace, for the words of the Great White Chief seem to be the words of nature speaking to my people out of dense darkness.

It matters little where we pass the remnant of our days. They will not be many. The Indian’s night promises to be dark. Not a single star of hope hovers above his horizon. Sad-voiced winds moan in the distance. Grim fate seems to be on the Red Man’s trail, and wherever he will hear the approaching footsteps of his fell destroyer and prepare stolidly to meet his doom, as does the wounded doe that hears the approaching footsteps of the hunter.

A few more moons, a few more winters, and not one of the descendants of the mighty hosts that once moved over this broad land or lived in happy homes, protected by the Great Spirit, will remain to mourn over the graves of a people once more powerful and hopeful than yours. But why should I mourn at the untimely fate of my people? Tribe follows tribe, and nation follows nation, like the waves of the sea. It is the order of nature, and regret is useless. Your time of decay may be distant, but it will surely come, for even the White Man whose God walked and talked with him as friend to friend, cannot be exempt from the common destiny. We may be brothers after all. We will see.

We will ponder your proposition and when we decide we will let you know. But should we accept it, I here and now make this condition that we will not be denied the privilege without molestation of visiting at any time the tombs of our ancestors, friends, and children. Every part of this soil is sacred in the estimation of my people. Every hillside, every valley, every plain and grove, has been hallowed by some sad or happy event in days long vanished. Even the rocks, which seem to be dumb and dead as the swelter in the sun along the silent shore, thrill with memories of stirring events connected with the lives of my people, and the very dust upon which you now stand responds more lovingly to their footsteps than yours, because it is rich with the blood of our ancestors, and our bare feet are conscious of the sympathetic touch. Our departed braves, fond mothers, glad, happy hearted maidens, and even the little children who lived here and rejoiced here for a brief season, will love these somber solitudes and at eventide they greet shadowy returning spirits. And when the last Red Man shall have perished, and the memory of my tribe shall have become a myth among the White Men, these shores will swarm with the invisible dead of my tribe, and when your children’s children think themselves alone in the field, the store, the shop, upon the highway, or in the silence of the pathless woods, they will not be alone. In all the earth there is no place dedicated to solitude. At night when the streets of your cities and villages are silent and you think them deserted, they will throng with the returning hosts that once filled them and still love this beautiful land. The White Man will never be alone.

Let him be just and deal kindly with my people, for the dead are not powerless. Dead, did I say? There is no death, only a change of worlds.

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Edward S Curtis Sampler (part 1)

Edward Curtis, produced many thousands of photographs during his epic chronicling of the faces, culture and homes of Native Americans of the Western United States. You can find the wikipedia article about his life here. This is what he looked like (as always, click the pic for larger size):

Edward_Curtis_Portrait

Much of his photography is available online- at least several thousand full resolution pictures, through the library of congress, here.

Cheyenne Crazy Dancers

Cheyenne Crazy Dancers

Cheyenne Peyote Leader

Cheyenne Peyote Leader

Camp on Little Big Horn

Camp on Little Big Horn

Apsarok- Crow Holy Man

Apsarok- Crow Holy Man

Red Cloud

Red Cloud

Planning a raid

Planning a raid

"Stinking Bear"

"Stinking Bear"

Blackfoot soldier: Fat Horse

Blackfoot soldier: Fat Horse

Old woman in mourning

Old woman in mourning

Snake Chief: Tevgui

Snake Chief: Tevgui

the_offering

O-Yi-Tsa

O-Yi-Tsa

Maricopa: Hoo-Man-Hai

Maricopa: Hoo-Man-Hai

War Gods of the Yebichai

War Gods of the Yebichai

Giving medecine

Giving medecine

Navaho: Zahadolzha

Navaho: Zahadolzha

Navaho mirror

Navaho mirror

Ruin at Canyondelmuerto

Ruin at Canyondelmuerto

Jicarilla man

Jicarilla man

Ye-Nin-Guy

Ye-Nin-Guy

Dance to restore the moon- lunar eclipse

Dance to restore the moon- lunar eclipse

That’s all I have time for right no0w. More later. Be happy 🙂

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The New Max

new-maxSo, this is a view of the construction area on the site of the demolished sections of the old J Complex at Oregon State Hospital. Some parts that are not yet demolished are in the foreground. The walls coming up in back are going to be the “ABC” (Acute Behavioral Care?) section of the new hospital- corresponds with the current maximum security unit on 48B. If you click the pic it will bring up the full-res 8-megapixel shot. But here’s what’s even more cool- they have put up a webcam that refreshes every 15 minutes and shows various angles of the construction zone.

Go here.

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R.I.P., Utah

rip-utah-phillips-all-used-up

rip-utah-phillips-with-ani-d-the-most-dangerous-woman

Enough said.

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From MindFreedom & the NYT

The New York Times

April 1, 2008
Colorado Proposes Tough Law on Executive Accountability By DAN FROSCH

DENVER — For 30 years, Lew Ellingson loved being a telephone man.

His job splicing phone cables was one that he says gave him “a true
sense of accomplishment,” first for Northwestern Bell, then US West
and finally Qwest Communications International.

But by the time Mr. Ellingson retired from Qwest last year at 52, he
had grown angry. An insider trading scandal had damaged the company’s
reputation, and the life savings of former colleagues had evaporated
in the face of Qwest‘s stock troubles.

“It was a good place,” he said wistfully. “And then something like
this happened.”

Now, Mr. Ellingson is the public face of a proposed ballot measure in
Colorado that seeks to create what supporters hope will be the
nation’s toughest corporate fraud law.

Buttressed by local advocacy groups and criticized by a Colorado
business organization, the measure would make business executives
criminally responsible if their companies run afoul of the law. It
would also permit any Colorado resident to sue the executives under
such circumstances. Proceeds from successful suits would go to the
state.

If passed by voters in November, the proposal would leave top
business officers having unprecedented individual accountability,
said Mr. Ellingson, a member of Protect Colorado’s Future, a
coalition of advocacy groups that supports the initiative.

“If nothing else, these folks in charge of the corporations and
companies will think twice about cutting corners to make themselves
look more profitable than they really are,” he said.

The plight of Mr. Ellingson’s former employer, Qwest, based in
Denver, was a motivation for the proposal, said Jess Knox, executive
director of Protect Colorado’s Future.

Last April, a jury in Denver convicted Qwest‘s former chief
executive, Joseph P. Nacchio, of 19 of 42 counts of insider trading.
Mr. Nacchio was sentenced to six years in prison and ordered to pay a
fine of $19 million and forfeit $52 million in money he earned from
stock sales in 2001.

In March, however, a federal appeals court panel reversed the
conviction on the grounds that a judge had improperly excluded expert
defense testimony.

The panel ordered that Mr. Nacchio receive a new trial in front of a
different judge.

“The reality is that for years, not just in Colorado but in many
states, citizen taxpayers have paid the price for C.E.O.’s and
companies who break the rules in order to get ahead,” Mr. Knox said.

Ultimately, the proposal would extend criminal and civil liability to
executives who knew about corporate fraud and did nothing to stop it,
but who were not necessarily involved in it, said Mark Grueskin, a
lawyer for Protect Colorado’s Future.

Not surprisingly, the proposal, and subsequent versions with
alternative language that have been suggested by Protect Colorado’s
Future, has generated sharp opposition from Colorado’s business
community.

If the measure is approved, some fear that the courts will become
overwhelmed with frivolous lawsuits. Those lawsuits, in turn, could
bankrupt small and midsize companies and make it more difficult for
legitimate lawsuits to succeed, said Joe Blake, president and chief
executive of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

“We’re very concerned that any number of people could crowd the
docket and frustrate the court system with suits that are perhaps
well-intentioned but highly frivolous,” he said. “We’re going to have
chaos out here.”

Mr. Grueskin countered that the measure would parallel current state
law and require plaintiffs to pay for their lawsuits if a court ruled
that they were frivolous.

“There is an inherent disincentive to use this as a means for a
gadfly to act as a corporate obstructionist,” he said. “I would be
surprised if there would be many responsible companies that would
have a problems with this.”

Legal fees aside, Dean Krehmeyer, executive director of the Business
Roundtable Institute for Corporate Ethics at the University of
Virginia
, which conducts ethics training for executives and
directors, says the litigious nature of the measure could create a
chasm between businesses and their communities.

“Leading business organizations and communities can create value by
working in partnership, not necessarily by using the courts as a
first option,” he said.

The measure, whose language was already approved by a state title
board, must receive 76,000 signatures in support within six months to
be placed on the November ballot. Protect Colorado’s Future said it
planned to start a signature campaign.

A lawyer for the chamber of commerce, Doug Friednash, said the
business group would file a challenge to the proposal in Colorado
Supreme Court on Tuesday. He said the language could mislead voters
into thinking they were supporting a measure that simply cracked down
on crooked executives, as opposed to one that left business owners
and other employees susceptible to lawsuits.

But Protect Colorado’s Future has already drafted a modified version,
cleared by the review board, that limits the initiative to executive
officials, its true intention, the group said. The chamber of
commerce, has asked the board to reconsider its decision on that
version at a hearing on Wednesday.

Regardless of which version of the measure is put to voters, Mr.
Ellingson predicts that Coloradoans, with the fallout from Qwest
still fresh, will back the proposal in overwhelming numbers.

“I don’t know who can oppose this. This is common sense,” he said.
“We need businesses to survive, but we don’t need criminals running
them.”

Wouldn’t it be great if we could hold all corporations accountable for the damage done in the name of profit? How many lives have been cut short by Zyprexa and other mis-used neuroleptics while Big Pharm reaps billions?

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I went to collage

i_went_to_collage-repost.gif

1923-okeh-laughing-record.mp3

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The 1913 Italian Hall Massacre

The copper strike of 1913-14 started in July and lasted nine months. It was one of Michigan’s most bitter labor actions. The introduction of the one-man drill triggered the strike. Miners feared cutbacks on the number of jobs and working alone. Strikers also demanded recognition of the Western Federation of Miners as their bargaining agent, a reduction from a 10-hour to an 8-hour work day, and $3.50 per day wages. The mining companies refused to recognize the union or to return to the two-man drill, but did, in the end, cut hours and increase wages. Miners who returned to work found themselves alongside men who had been hired as strikebreakers. In the following years, many experienced miners left the Copper Country for the auto factories of Detroit, mining jobs inthe western U. S. or military service with the outbreak of World War I in 1917. The strike was a bitter struggle. Michigan state militia, on horseback, was deployed against the strikers. Strike leaders, lead by “Big” Annie Clemenic, rallied the strikers by hosting a Christmas party at the Italian hall. While the miners’ families were celebrating Christmas Eve at Italian Hall in Calumet someone yelled, “Fire!” In panic, the crowd rushed to get out of the second-floor hall. They could not open the door to the outside, and 73 people–mostly children–died in the crush.There was no fire. Many miners believed that the mine companies had sent the person who caused the panic, although this could never proved it seems the most likely explaination. Eye witnesses saw company agents in the area but could not identify them. The crime remains unsolved.

In recent times the hall fell on disrepair. Local Unions, including the North West Upper Peninsula Labor Council, and a variety of volunteers, purchased the site and the surrounding land. They restored it and preserved it as a monument to Michigan’s workers. These individuals kept the incident and the site from fading into the mists of history.

BeforeBefore

Mother Jones marches with the strikers before the masscreMother Jones marches with the strikers

The victimsThe victims

Woody Guthrie’s song about this event

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